Brexit: Britain is turning away trade deals because of lack of capacity, Liam Fox claims

1 London

London News & Search

1 News - 1 eMovies - 1 eMusic - 1 eBooks - 1 Search

Britain is turning away potential trade deals because it does not have the “capacity” to negotiate them, Liam Fox has admitted.

The International Trade Secretary said : “There are a number of countries who said they would like to move directly to a new free-trade agreement but we have said we are simply unable to do that at the moment.”

He told Politico that deals were “dependent on our own capacity in our own department”. The Department for International Trade, set up a year ago, has struggled to recruit specialist negotiators.

The Cabinet was today meeting for the first time since ministers informally agreed to avoid a “cliff-edge Brexit” by seeking a transition period after 2019.

Labour’s shadow cabinet was expected to agreed to oppose the withdrawal Bill in the first key vote next week on the grounds that it gave too few guarantees to protect rights and avoid scrutiny in Parliament.

Brexit backer Chris Grayling, the Transport Secretary, this morning said Britain could expect to pay a “divorce” bill in comments that contrasted with Boris Johnson’s claim that the EU could “go whistle” for money.

Asked if it could be £50 billion to £100 billion, as some have reported, he told Today: “We are a country that accepts our liabilities and pays our bills, we have never said otherwise.” But he stressed that every line would be scrutinised.

Mr Grayling attacked Labour’s decision to oppose the “repeal bill”, saying: “What this bill actually does is it ensures there isn’t a legal cliff edge when we leave the EU.”

Icelandic foreign minister Gudlaugur Thor Thordarson said “everyone” wants a free trade deal with the UK, telling BBC radio: “Everybody wants to sell you goods and services. It’s just as simple as that.”


1 London

London News & Search

1 News - 1 eMovies - 1 eMusic - 1 eBooks - 1 Search


Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutube

Leave a Reply