UCAS clearing 2017: two in three students in clearing 'make snap decision' over university places

1 London

London News & Search

1 News - 1 eMovies - 1 eMusic - 1 eBooks - 1 Search

Two thirds of students spend less than two hours deciding their futures as they go through clearing, according to a new study.

Fifty-nine per cent of students surveyed by London South Bank University said they made a snap decision during clearing, a process that gives students who do not already hold a place or who miss the grades for their offers to still go on to university.

A third of the 500 students polled told LSBU researchers they had decided on their university in less than an hour, while two thirds decided in less than two hours.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, 67 per cent said they found clearing stressful, with students describing it to researchers as “no man’s land” and “upsetting”.

Clearing is being seen as increasingly important for universities to fill vacancies on under-subscribed courses as shock figures from UCAS showed applications falling by some 25,000 this year – the first drop since higher fees were introduced in 2012.

Professor David Phoenix, vice chancellor of LSBU, said: “These results underline just how stressful the clearing process can be for students and the impact it is having on their ability to make informed decisions, which will in turn affect their future career paths or job prospects. 

“With 54 per cent of students citing that their school did not provide them with enough information about clearing, it is evident that far more needs to be done to educate and reassure pupils in advance of results day.”

LSBU said students and schools needed to take more time planning in advance of A-level results day, which will see a fresh crop of school leavers collecting their grades on Thursday.

It has launched a pop-up space on the South Bank to provide students the chance to speak to clearing support staff and student ambassadors.  


1 London

London News & Search

1 News - 1 eMovies - 1 eMusic - 1 eBooks - 1 Search


Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutube

Leave a Reply